Ron Nevison

Ron Nevison

Multi-platinum record producer Ron Nevison actually started out in the music business doing live sound. After living that life for awhile, Nevison began to grow restless and, while on the road with Steve Winwood’s group, Traffic, in the late 60’s, Nevison moved on from the live sound world and landed a job at Island Studios. Critics first took note of Nevison's exceptional ear far ahead of many of his pop-rock peers, with one prominent example of the latter being Rolling Stone Magazine's observation in their 1973 review of The Who's Quadrophenia, which Nevison engineered, that the album had been "magnificently recorded.

Nevison's profile continued to rise through the mid-1970s as he helped to sonically shape a new generation of AOR rock via his engineering work on the first 3 Bad Company's LPs, Thin Lizzy, and perhaps most notably on Led Zeppelin's 1975 Physical Graffiti LP among a host of others. By the 1980s, Nevison began carving out a niche for himself as the go-to producer for veteran rock acts needing a reintroduction to a new generation of rock fans, whether it was with Survivor's Vital Signs or smash hits like "These Dreams" and "Alone" by Heart.

Ron Nevison's career highlights include many of the record industry's highest distinctions, including his being recognized as Billboard Magazine's Top-5 Producer of the Year four separate times, garnering countless GRAMMY-nominated and winning hit records/albums, and producing well over 100 million albums sold in the course of his almost four-decade career. With the pop-rock genre he helped to invent alive as ever almost a decade into the millennium, Nevison reasons that, "I think my production style, as a derivative on a new school of producers, is starting to come around because the '70s is making a comeback. And what happens in this cyclical kind of thing, in ten years, the '80s will be coming around again. Fourteen year-old musicians are forming bands now and listening to Led Zeppelin. And its amazing that thirteen year-old kids right now have gone from Britney two years ago, to hip hop at thirteen, to Led Zeppelin at fourteen. Talk to me in another five or ten years, and I'll probably be more relevant than I am now."

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